Keynote Speakers | 2018 Solutions Conference
October 22, 23, & 24

Monday Keynote - Frank Pastizzo

Frank Pastizzo HeadshotWe look forward to welcoming Frank Pastizzo as this year’s Keynote Speaker on Monday, October 22.

Seeing all services as human services, Frank draws upon over thirty years of experience as an Emergency Room Technician, a high school English and Drama and Special Education Teacher, a Health Care Administrator, Marketing Executive, Professional Actor, Comic, and Musician. His energetic programs are sparked with comedy, live music, and poignant stories from the arenas of business, health care, and education.

During his keynote, Frank will use a wonderful mix of music, comedy, and storytelling from his diverse career to capture the audience, helping us to reflect on the values of kindness and respect in all of our relationships. Exploring the dynamics of diverse workplaces, he will present clear and concise directions on how all of us can contribute to making our jobs rich with humor, humanity, and joy.

Frank draws on a quote from Louis Lamour, which says: Masters in the art of living know no clear distinction between their work and their play, their labor or their recreation. They hardly know which is which. They simply pursue their vision of excellence through whatever they are doing and leave others to determine whether they are at work or at play. To themselves they always seem to be doing both.

Tuesday Keynote - ODP Acting Deputy Secretary Kristin Ahrens

Kristin Ahrens

PAR looks forward to welcoming Office of Developmental Programs (ODP) Acting Deputy Secretary Kristin Ahrens as a Keynote Speaker on Tuesday, October 23.

Kristin Ahrens is the Acting Deputy Secretary for the Office of Developmental Programs. Previously Kristin served as the Director of the Bureau of Policy and Quality Management in Pennsylvania's Office of Developmental Programs. Before joining the Office of Developmental Programs, she served as the Policy Director for the Institute on Disabilities at Temple University. Ms. Ahrens' 25 years of experience working with people with disabilities spans from advocacy and community education to providing supported living, family support and self-directed services and includes development and management of several self-directed models. Prior to moving to Pennsylvania, Ms. Ahrens was the Director of Self-Determination Resources, Inc. (SDRI), a regional brokerage serving adults with I/DD, in Oregon. Ms. Ahrens has a Masters in Education and Disability Studies Certificate from Temple University.

 

Tuesday Keynote - Pennsylvania Auditor General Eugene DePasquale

DePasqualePAR is pleased to announce that Pennsylvania Auditor General Eugene DePasquale, the chief fiscal watchdog for the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, will Keynote at PAR's 2018 Solutions Conference on Tuesday, October 23. Eugene A. DePasquale began his second term as Pennsylvania’s 51st Auditor General on January 17, 2017 and his audits have identified nearly $600 million in misspent or potentially recoverable state money including urging the state pension plans to cut another $100 million in Wall Street investment fees.

Auditor General DePasquale was born and raised in Pittsburgh, where he graduated from Pittsburgh Central Catholic High School as a member of the state championship football team. He earned his undergraduate degree from the College of Wooster in Ohio, where he played baseball and football. He went on to earn his Master’s in Public Administration from the University of Pittsburgh’s Graduate School of Public and International Affairs (GSPIA), and his law degree from the Widener University School of Law. He lives in York County, where he enjoys watching his teenagers, Ben and Sarah, play music and sports. Before winning statewide election as Auditor General, DePasquale served three terms in the House of Representatives, where he built a proven track record of consistently working to make Pennsylvania government more ethical and open. The first member of the General Assembly to post his expenses online, he also fought for middle-class jobs, education funding and a ban on texting while driving.